nativeamericannews:

Hunger Games on the Rez: Filmmakers Plan Dystopian Pine Ridge Drama
It’s 2085 on Pine Ridge. The reservation has been quarantined and borders guarded by the military for 30 years. Sparked by the ramifications of the Keystone XL pipeline, the war between the government and the insurgency lasted for eight years and resulted in the dystopian setting that provides the background for “The People,” the inaugural project from Indigene Studios.

Wild thing about dystopia is, it’s already dystopia for someone. For Natives, it’s been dystopia since 1492. Environmental racism and injustice will lead to very dire consequences. We’ll be seeing them long before 2085.

nativeamericannews:

Hunger Games on the Rez: Filmmakers Plan Dystopian Pine Ridge Drama

It’s 2085 on Pine Ridge. The reservation has been quarantined and borders guarded by the military for 30 years. Sparked by the ramifications of the Keystone XL pipeline, the war between the government and the insurgency lasted for eight years and resulted in the dystopian setting that provides the background for “The People,” the inaugural project from Indigene Studios.

Wild thing about dystopia is, it’s already dystopia for someone. For Natives, it’s been dystopia since 1492. Environmental racism and injustice will lead to very dire consequences. We’ll be seeing them long before 2085.

(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com, via ladymakomori)

"This report raises grave concerns about #fracking pollution’s threat to California’s air and water. But it also highlights the fact that government officials have never collected the data needed to determine the extent of the damage in our state. Using this report as a basis for continued fracking in California is illogical and illegal."
-

Kassie Siegel, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s Climate Law Institute (via DeSmogBlog)

The Center for Biological Diversity, along with the Sierra Club, sued the federal government last year, arguing that the Obama Administration had broken the law when it decided to lease some 2,500 acres of public lands in Monterey County to oil and gas companies without properly studying the environmental risks of fracking.
(via navigatethestream)

(via navigatethestream)

resistkxl:

Dolores Leonard, 79, who lives in Detroit zip code 48217.
The 48217 ZIP code is in an area of Detroit surrounded by industry: coal burning, tar sands crude oil refining, steel production, and salt mining. It also borders I-75, a major north to south Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes region. The pollution from these sources combined results in approximately 1.6 million pounds of hazardous chemicals released into the community each year.
The chemical releases result in serious health issues for residents. Wayne County, which houses the infamous ZIP code, has the highest number of pediatric asthma cases in the state. Also, 48217 and the three ZIPs that surround it have “significantly higher” rates of newly diagnosed cases of lung and bronchus cancers than the rest of Michigan, according to a state Department of Community Healthstudy.
[…]
The fact that 48217′s residents are mostly black and low-income only compounds the problems, and makes them harder to solve. The area’s 8,200 people are more than 84 percent black, with an average household income of $54,706, more than $20,000 below the national average. The income level that describes the majority of residents is the lowest bracket — less than $15,000 a year.
more here [x]

resistkxl:

Dolores Leonard, 79, who lives in Detroit zip code 48217.

The 48217 ZIP code is in an area of Detroit surrounded by industry: coal burning, tar sands crude oil refining, steel production, and salt mining. It also borders I-75, a major north to south Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes region. The pollution from these sources combined results in approximately 1.6 million pounds of hazardous chemicals released into the community each year.

The chemical releases result in serious health issues for residents. Wayne County, which houses the infamous ZIP code, has the highest number of pediatric asthma cases in the state. Also, 48217 and the three ZIPs that surround it have “significantly higher” rates of newly diagnosed cases of lung and bronchus cancers than the rest of Michigan, according to a state Department of Community Healthstudy.

[…]

The fact that 48217′s residents are mostly black and low-income only compounds the problems, and makes them harder to solve. The area’s 8,200 people are more than 84 percent black, with an average household income of $54,706, more than $20,000 below the national average. The income level that describes the majority of residents is the lowest bracket — less than $15,000 a year.

more here [x]

(via navigatethestream)

micdotcom:

Vile photos show the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border no one is talking about

With a spate of huge stories breaking in the past few weeks, you might not have caught the massive environmental crisis in northern Mexico that began earlier in August.

According to the Associated Press, local politicians claim that Grupo Mexico, a private mining company in Sonora with a troubling track record of hazardous waste violations in Mexico and the U.S., was slow to report a disastrous fault in its leaching ponds, which hold industrial acid used in the mining process. The spill released around 10 million gallons of acid into the Bacanuchi and Sonora Rivers.

20,000 people were without water | Follow micdotcom 

(via fallenangellostfeathers)

"Naturally then, the mountains, the creatures, the entire non-human world is struggling to make contact with us. The plants we eat or smoke are trying to ask us what we are up to; the animals are signalling to us in our dreams or in forests; the whole Earth is rumbling & straining to let us remember that we are of it, that this planet, the macrocosm is our flesh, that the grasses are our hair, the trees are our hands, the rivers our blood, that the Earth is our real body and that it is alive."
- David Abram  (via hoodoo-seed)

(Source: nakedbreath, via hoodoo-seed)

Think people of color don't care about the environment? Think again

afro-dominicano:

freakygeekyblerd:

afro-dominicano:

sweetteascience:

Dorceta Taylor, professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, talks about her new report about environmental groups’ failure to diversify.

Amazing follow-up article to one about a newly released report on diversity in the environmental movement. 

See also:

New report expounds on old problem: Lack of diversity in green groups

Green 2.0 Report

Never heard anyone saying “Poc don’t care about the environment” especially considering how well known it is that a lot of present time’s environmental collapses has been due to greedy white men running poisonous businesses.

^^^^EXACTLY! I had to side-eye that part. Especially since we are usually the first to suffer the effects of poor environmental stewardship in the first place.

Not to mention since we’re usually the one’s at an economic disadvantage that leaves us forced to create new and innovative ways of saving our environment in a cheap yet effective way that white people later find out about and take credit for.

(via dynastylnoire)

Global Pollution and Prevention News: Record Radiation in South America

Astrobiologists from the United States and Germany recorded the highest known level of solar UV radiation to reach Earth’s surface. This was around 10 years ago.

On December 29, 2003, the UV Index (UVI) peaked, reaching the blistering number of 43.3 over the Andes Mountains in Bolivia. To put this in context, a beachgoer in the United States would expect a UVI of 8 or 9 on a summer day. Even with those numbers, one may not escape the day without sunburn.

Nonetheless, it has taken scientists 10 years to detail a report of this data while taking into account of the variables and anomalies monitored from an international network of dosimeters — or Eldonets (European Light Dosimeter Network) — that measure UV radiation worldwide. This system is comprised of more than 100 stations across 5 continents to account for variation in the atmosphere above each station.

In fact, around 35% of the peak data from the station at the summit of Licancabur volcano in the Andes was lost — it was only through the wide scope of Eldonets that the data could be placed.

And the reason behind a staggering UVI of 43.3 — a list of uncertainties:

-       Ozone depletion in a region where column ozone is naturally the thinnest

-       NOAs (negative ozone anomalies), which has to do with air circulation

-       A solar flare on November 4, 2003 that increased solar irradiance

Unlike the sky on that December day in 2003, the explanation behind the “perfect storm” of conditions is clouded. 

But, what does this mean for us? 10 years removed from these dangerous conditions, CFCs and some other harmful aerosols have been phased out of every day use, but they still persist in the atmosphere. Ozone depletion means that we are running out of our natural sunscreen.

Short-wave ultraviolet radiation damages DNA and causes cancer, affects reproduction in all organisms, and prevents photosynthesis. Some plants that we rely on for food and entire food chains (phytoplankton) are even more sensitive to short-wave UV rays than humans. This is especially concerning to the future of food security in a world of rapid population growth. After all, plants can’t reapply every 2 hours.

This report — 10 years in the making — attempts to shine light on the harsh reality of ozone depletion. 

For more information visit frontiers.

solar radiation ozone depletion Eldonets