resistkxl:

Dolores Leonard, 79, who lives in Detroit zip code 48217.
The 48217 ZIP code is in an area of Detroit surrounded by industry: coal burning, tar sands crude oil refining, steel production, and salt mining. It also borders I-75, a major north to south Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes region. The pollution from these sources combined results in approximately 1.6 million pounds of hazardous chemicals released into the community each year.
The chemical releases result in serious health issues for residents. Wayne County, which houses the infamous ZIP code, has the highest number of pediatric asthma cases in the state. Also, 48217 and the three ZIPs that surround it have “significantly higher” rates of newly diagnosed cases of lung and bronchus cancers than the rest of Michigan, according to a state Department of Community Healthstudy.
[…]
The fact that 48217′s residents are mostly black and low-income only compounds the problems, and makes them harder to solve. The area’s 8,200 people are more than 84 percent black, with an average household income of $54,706, more than $20,000 below the national average. The income level that describes the majority of residents is the lowest bracket — less than $15,000 a year.
more here [x]

resistkxl:

Dolores Leonard, 79, who lives in Detroit zip code 48217.

The 48217 ZIP code is in an area of Detroit surrounded by industry: coal burning, tar sands crude oil refining, steel production, and salt mining. It also borders I-75, a major north to south Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes region. The pollution from these sources combined results in approximately 1.6 million pounds of hazardous chemicals released into the community each year.

The chemical releases result in serious health issues for residents. Wayne County, which houses the infamous ZIP code, has the highest number of pediatric asthma cases in the state. Also, 48217 and the three ZIPs that surround it have “significantly higher” rates of newly diagnosed cases of lung and bronchus cancers than the rest of Michigan, according to a state Department of Community Healthstudy.

[…]

The fact that 48217′s residents are mostly black and low-income only compounds the problems, and makes them harder to solve. The area’s 8,200 people are more than 84 percent black, with an average household income of $54,706, more than $20,000 below the national average. The income level that describes the majority of residents is the lowest bracket — less than $15,000 a year.

more here [x]

(via navigatethestream)

micdotcom:

Vile photos show the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border no one is talking about

With a spate of huge stories breaking in the past few weeks, you might not have caught the massive environmental crisis in northern Mexico that began earlier in August.

According to the Associated Press, local politicians claim that Grupo Mexico, a private mining company in Sonora with a troubling track record of hazardous waste violations in Mexico and the U.S., was slow to report a disastrous fault in its leaching ponds, which hold industrial acid used in the mining process. The spill released around 10 million gallons of acid into the Bacanuchi and Sonora Rivers.

20,000 people were without water | Follow micdotcom 

(via fallenangellostfeathers)

"Naturally then, the mountains, the creatures, the entire non-human world is struggling to make contact with us. The plants we eat or smoke are trying to ask us what we are up to; the animals are signalling to us in our dreams or in forests; the whole Earth is rumbling & straining to let us remember that we are of it, that this planet, the macrocosm is our flesh, that the grasses are our hair, the trees are our hands, the rivers our blood, that the Earth is our real body and that it is alive."
- David Abram  (via hoodoo-seed)

(Source: nakedbreath, via hoodoo-seed)

Think people of color don't care about the environment? Think again

afro-dominicano:

freakygeekyblerd:

afro-dominicano:

sweetteascience:

Dorceta Taylor, professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, talks about her new report about environmental groups’ failure to diversify.

Amazing follow-up article to one about a newly released report on diversity in the environmental movement. 

See also:

New report expounds on old problem: Lack of diversity in green groups

Green 2.0 Report

Never heard anyone saying “Poc don’t care about the environment” especially considering how well known it is that a lot of present time’s environmental collapses has been due to greedy white men running poisonous businesses.

^^^^EXACTLY! I had to side-eye that part. Especially since we are usually the first to suffer the effects of poor environmental stewardship in the first place.

Not to mention since we’re usually the one’s at an economic disadvantage that leaves us forced to create new and innovative ways of saving our environment in a cheap yet effective way that white people later find out about and take credit for.

(via dynastylnoire)

Global Pollution and Prevention News: Record Radiation in South America

Astrobiologists from the United States and Germany recorded the highest known level of solar UV radiation to reach Earth’s surface. This was around 10 years ago.

On December 29, 2003, the UV Index (UVI) peaked, reaching the blistering number of 43.3 over the Andes Mountains in Bolivia. To put this in context, a beachgoer in the United States would expect a UVI of 8 or 9 on a summer day. Even with those numbers, one may not escape the day without sunburn.

Nonetheless, it has taken scientists 10 years to detail a report of this data while taking into account of the variables and anomalies monitored from an international network of dosimeters — or Eldonets (European Light Dosimeter Network) — that measure UV radiation worldwide. This system is comprised of more than 100 stations across 5 continents to account for variation in the atmosphere above each station.

In fact, around 35% of the peak data from the station at the summit of Licancabur volcano in the Andes was lost — it was only through the wide scope of Eldonets that the data could be placed.

And the reason behind a staggering UVI of 43.3 — a list of uncertainties:

-       Ozone depletion in a region where column ozone is naturally the thinnest

-       NOAs (negative ozone anomalies), which has to do with air circulation

-       A solar flare on November 4, 2003 that increased solar irradiance

Unlike the sky on that December day in 2003, the explanation behind the “perfect storm” of conditions is clouded. 

But, what does this mean for us? 10 years removed from these dangerous conditions, CFCs and some other harmful aerosols have been phased out of every day use, but they still persist in the atmosphere. Ozone depletion means that we are running out of our natural sunscreen.

Short-wave ultraviolet radiation damages DNA and causes cancer, affects reproduction in all organisms, and prevents photosynthesis. Some plants that we rely on for food and entire food chains (phytoplankton) are even more sensitive to short-wave UV rays than humans. This is especially concerning to the future of food security in a world of rapid population growth. After all, plants can’t reapply every 2 hours.

This report — 10 years in the making — attempts to shine light on the harsh reality of ozone depletion. 

For more information visit frontiers.

solar radiation ozone depletion Eldonets

12 easy steps to a green dorm room

Getting ready to start college life? Here are some tips to help you create a green living space

Every year, intrepid young men and women set out for college. Even more exciting than this, is that for many of them, it’s their first chance to live away from home. But, with the excitement and fun of furnishing a new dorm room comes a price. Every year, college students (and their parents) generate thousands of tons of garbage, because of the choices they make in buying furniture and accessories. Luckily, getting your dorm to be green has never been easier. All it takes is a little effort, a little creativity, and a few tips and tricks.

As with most activities, we recommend carefully considering your needs before purchasing anything. Going off to college is one step toward starting a new life as an adult, and it can feel like you need lots of stuff to make it work, so it’s worth your time to vet the list and only go for what you really need. Happily, lots of resources exist to help keep furnishing your new home away from home into an endless search for stuff. And, because lots of people do it every year, there are lots of gently used resources (at greatly reduced prices) out there, waiting for you to snap up and make your own.

Beyond the actual stuff you’ll need, going green in your dorm room is also about adopting a green point of view. For example, instead of loading up on bottled water to help stay hydrated during all-night study sessions, grab a BPA-free water bottle (like a Bilt or Kleen Kanteen) and a tabletop water filter, or a filtering system that you can keep in the fridge. Rather than running extension cords everywhere to power your electronic gear, put them all on power strips, so you can easily keep them from sucking too much phantom power out of the electricity grid. Instead of using plug-in air fresheners, stock up on plants that improve indoor air quality to help keep your room smelling fresh without all that toxic stinky stuff.

Your dorm room is your castle, while you’re at school, at least, so there’s no better time to learn some green lessons that you can apply to living the rest of your green life. Read on for a bounty of ideas and tips for greening your dorm room this year.

Top Green Dorm Room Tips

  1. Keep it local
    Many college students want an “away from home” experience. Just don’t make it a “shipping tons of stuff all over the country” experience. If it’s your first year at school, try to obtain your furnishings locally when you get to school (See tips 2 and 3). If you’re a returning student, think about local storage—many schools offer storage options.

  1. Use the used
    Sure, this may be your first home away from home, and we understand the urge to decorate with all the coolest new stuff from Target or WalMart. Just consider, for a second, how much waste that would mean, assuming most freshmen get relatively new stuff every year of school. See what we mean? Instead, why not check out great used sources of stuff, like local resale shops, eBay Local, andCraigslist. You’ll be guaranteed to have a really unique room décor (see tip 10 to max this out), and you’ll have money left over to throw wild parties (Um, we mean library study snacks).
  1. Capture the free
    Of course, while cheap used stuff is good, there is something better: Free used stuff. If you’re a new freshman, check out Craigslist or Freecycle in your area to see if there are any items like beds, desks, or lamps that you can score for free. If you stayed at school over the summer for research or whatnot, your university may have a coordinated furniture recycling day. Or, you might just hang around during move-out and see what you can collect. In many places, you can almost completely furnish apartment by just hanging out around student housing at the end of the school year.

  1. Condition yourself, not your air
    One of the most eco-friendly things you can do as a student is to give up air conditioning. Many universities make it really easy for you to do by banning AC units in dorms. But that doesn’t stop some crafty students from sneaking them in. The trouble is, there are millions of students all over the world, which means the potential for hundreds of thousands of energy-sucking AC units. Instead of AC, why not try opening a window, turning on a fan, taking a cold shower before bed, or studying outside. Of course, if you have to have AC for allergies or some other reason, be sure to get an Energy-Star rated low-energy unit.
  1. Be sure your fridge is cool
    Another big energy-sucker of dorms is the ol’ microfridge. Of course, the best thing you can do is go fridgeless or check into a shared larger fridge (many dorms have shared kitchens with fridges). But if you must have a fridge to yourself, make sure it’s energy-star or other low-energy certified. This can save you 50 percent of the energy use of regular appliances.

  1. Cook it right
    You may scoff at the microwave/toaster oven combo, but by combining these two cooking appliances with a cheap rice cooker, you’ve got nearly the perfect eco-kitchen. All three of these appliances boast high energy efficiencies relative to their big-kitchen counterparts.

    But remember, the best way to cook in a green way is to get social with it. Cooking with friends is cheaper and much more fun. You can experiment with green recipes (we have tons of suggestions) and work out a good system for sharing the burden of buying, cooking and cleaning.

  1. Paper please
    Sure, it’s not the sexiest of materials, but there are plenty of paper options for dorm decor that can be recycled when you out-grow them in a few years. Check out paper wall tiles from MioCulture, paper window treatments from Redi Shade, or make your own paper lampshades.

  1. See the light
    Stick with light emitting diode bulbs. The newer ones put out great light, use just a trickle of electricity, and last almost forever. This is one thing worth buying again every time you move; by leaving them for your next tenant, you’ll be spreading the green love with every new apartment.
  1. Don’t let the sheets hit the fan
    Linens for your new room will make up the bulk of the rest of your buying. When you look for sheets, curtains, or towels, go for organic cotton, if possible. It’s still the same cottony goodness, but you’ll rest easy knowing it’s grown without nasty pesticides. Another option is flax. In general, flax uses less water and fewer pesticides than cotton. If you can, go with organic flax and it’s pesticide free, so it makes for great linen
  1. Re-used doesn’t have to mean re-pulsive
    Just because you got used stuff, doesn’t mean it has to be old and moldy. This is college. You’re supposed to be wild and experimental. So go crazy. Why not try sewing some cushion covers, or pillows for that old couch. Or invite some of your new friends over for a painting party on that old dresser and table. Unleash your inner crafter with great magazines like MakeCraft, or Readymade.

  1. Learn from camping
    When you go camping, you hardly bring anything and yet you get by just fine. Thinking about what you use when you go camping can be a great way to figure out how to cut down on unnecessary items. It makes it easier to move out at the end of the year - you won’t have as much clutter! Camping also teaches you how to go portable. We all know how cramped dorm rooms can be, so consider portable transformer furniture. It folds away and is really easy to use.
  1. Look for a green dorm
    More and more colleges are offering green dorms. They can have composting toilets, be made from recycled materials, and use geothermal heating. Do some research and find out if your college offers any.

Green Dorm Rooms: By the Numbers

  • 20 percent: Estimated reduction in energy use at Stanford’s Lotus Living Laboratory green dorms.
  • $18.95: Estimated savings per student, over the course of a year, for Tulane’s Energy Star Showcase Dorm Room.

  • $61,728.40: Estimated annual savings that Tulane would realize if every dorm room matched the performance of the Energy Star Showcase room.
  • 968,073: Pounds of CO2 Tulane could save annually by creating Energy Star dorm rooms across campus.

  • 30 percent: Estimated reduction in both energy and water use at Tufts University’s Sophia Gordon Hall, the university’s first green dorm building that opened in 2006.
  • 47 percent: Amount of energy used on lighting at Macalester University, making lighting the largest consumer of electricity in their dorms.

  • 102 Watts: Size of the solar panel that University of Vermont student Ross Nizle purchased to help take his dorm room off the grid.
  • 25,000 pounds: Estimated amount of reusable goods kept out of landfills by this year’s inaugural “Green Apple Move Out” event at NYU.

Sources: Stanford’s Lotus Living LaboratoryEnergy StarTulane UniversityTufts UniversityMacalester UniversityUniversity of VermontNew York University

Green Dorm Rooms: Getting Techie


Why are microwaves and crockpots so good?
Cooking options like microwave ovens, toaster ovens, crock pots, and rice cookers concentrate the heat in the food, instead of heating so much extra air, or metal like conventional ovens and frying pans do. Electric grills are also heavy-duty energy users because they operate at such high temperatures (this also makes them fire hazards, and banned by many dorms). The lowest energy way to a meal is to think about what you need heated up, and what tool best to heat it with. Microwaves heat evenly throughout the food, especially if it is wet, like mashed potatoes, boiling water, or meat. Toaster ovens are really good at browning the surface of food (try cooking chicken or steak part way in a microwave and then browning in a toaster oven. It’s super fast, and delicious). Rice cookers are great for rice, or rice and frozen vegetables, and some of them come with attachments to steam veggies like broccoli at the same time. Crock pots are a whole other kind of cooking, but with practice, and a good cookbook, they can be the easiest and tastiest kind of food preparation, especially for a time-crunched student.

EPEAT: Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool
EPEAT is a standard system for evaluating, certifying and registering green computers and other electronics. EPEAT provides a clear and consistent set of performance criteria for the design of products, and provides an opportunity for manufacturers to secure market recognition for efforts to reduce the environmental impact of its products. The rating system evaluates computer and other electronic products according to three tiers of environmental performance — Bronze, Silver, and Gold. There are 51 total environmental criteria: 23 required and 28 optional criteria, and products earn respective labels for the total number of criteria met.

Climate-neutral campuses
The American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, or ACUPCC, is an effort to address greenhouse gas emissions on college campuses across the country. By signing the climate commitment, each university is pledging to work toward climate neutrality, eliminating their contributions to global warming over time. To date, more than 500 colleges and universities in all 50 states have signed the Commitment; together, signatories enroll more than 25 percent of college students in the country.

green living dorm living college green dorms

'RiverBlue' documentary wants to save our rivers from the denim industry

Trailer here!

RiverBlue environmentalism pollution denim industry rivers Access to Water